They said it.....the best of Jörg and Seb

Jörg Riechers and Sébastien Audigane have always been forthright, honest and upfront about telling how it is. Their remarks have detailed the dark and the light sides of eacing around the the world, the two sides of the same coin, the cruel and the kind. Here is a brief summary of some of their outstanding quotes:

News APR 16, 2015 10:09

The best quotes of Jörg Riechers and Sébastien Audigane
Jörg Riechers and Sébastien Audigane have always been forthright, honest and upfront about telling how it is. Their remarks have detailed the dark and the light sides of eacing around the the world, the two sides of the same coin, the cruel and the kind. Here is a brief summary of some of their outstanding quotes:

Sébastien Audigane - 01.26.2015 In the Roaring Forties
"It's cold dothe wn here and now albatrosses are arriving this morning. I have trouble writing, the boat moves in every way. It is as is I am co-driver to Sébastien Loeb trying to write during a mountain rally stage."

Jörg Riechers - 31.01.2015 In the Indian
"At the moment the Indian is not what we expected. Surely some times there will come, big winds, big waves and everything you expect from the Southern Ocean ".

Jörg Riechers - 02/03/2015 About food
"We have tons of food on board. Sometimes we eat three or four times a day. So the chances are good that when we get to Barcelona Sébastien and I have to diet. We must be the first team in the Barcelona World Race to be gaining weight instead of losing it!"

Sébastien Audigane - 02/16/2015 Malfunction rudders
"Last night, before hoisting our big gennaker we checked  the rudders. Then we realized that a large part of the outer skin of the starboard rudder was gone, as well as a small piece at the bottom. Obviously we had hit something, but we had not heard anything, and the boat's course remained stable. The rudder was really damaged, it was necessary to cut a piece and clean the shattered fibers and then put on the sheath instead. But we can not sail at one hundred percent downwind, when we push and surf we lose control of the boat. Above 19 knots of wind, the helm is very hard, it's like if  you lose steeering in a car at 100 mph "

Jörg Riechers - 09/03/2015 Approaching Cape Horn
"Cape Horn is the  gateway to hell. The tropical depression that follows us from New Zealand is about to become a weather freak. It will bounce off the Andes, will head  south and drop to 951 mb pressure, a real hurricane! For us it is a race against time: if we are quick enough and get out of here having lost only some feathers to face a wind of 45-50 knots and waves of seven meters. If we delay or if the depression is moving faster than expected, then it will be hell, with winds of 65-70 knots and waves of 13 meters. We're a little nervous. The atmosphere is heavy, but it is the birthday of Séb ... I have a lump in my throat. "

Jörg Riechers - 11/03/2015 Cape Horn
"We have survived. It has not been easy. Just after the Cape, we thought it would be easy. Without stress. But one mile after the Cape we had the first big blast, with 70 knots of wind, so the boat was knocked flat with three reefs in the main and J3. We were frightened enough, we recovered, rolled in the J3 and continued with three reefs in the main. And yet we planed at 24 and 25 knots. The sea was very white with spume everywhere. As it was quite chilling. So my first Horn has been a proper big one."

Sébastien Audigane - 11/03/2015 Cape Horn
"In the 25 years I've been doing races, had never sailed in such difficult conditions as we found this time at Cape Horn. Luckily, we have prepared well and planned and reduced sail well in advance ".

Sébastien Audigane - 15/03/2015 Farewell to the Big South
"Last night at sunset, came a flying albatross that seemed to say goodbye ... At least this is what I like to think.  The South and the Roaring Forties are in our wake, the water temperature gradually increases, now to enjoy some sun in the Atlantic and soon enjoy a good shower ".

Jörg Riechers, after Gibraltar, 13/04/2015
"We have sailed upwind since the Falklands. I have never sailed upwind so much in my life. I think I have one leg shorter than the other now because we have been upwind so much, the boat is heeled so much. We had a lot of technical problems. It has been more a fight against technical problems than the weather and waves. I am definitely happy it is is over. We are happy to have done it. We have learned a lot. That is good.  But, ooooooof, I am happy it is nearly over. "